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The Police Chief Advocates Marijuana Regulation Education!

The Capital City’s new police chief, Eric Wilde, is urging residents to familiarise themselves with the specifics of Amendment 3 before recreational marijuana sales begin.

Voters in November approved a constitutional amendment that legalized recreational marijuana use and sales to those over the age of 21. One month after possession was made legal, sales started.

In addition to allowing for the issuance of personal cultivation licenses in Missouri, the referendum proposal mandated the expungement of offenses involving marijuana.

Even though the local government and police department reviewed the amendment in depth before it went to the ballot, Wilde said there have been plenty of misconceptions and inquiries from the area after the amendment passed, so everyone should be aware of what’s in the new legislation.

In his opinion, users and would-be users should be informed of local personal use restrictions, even though the business license application procedure, state tax increases, and criminal expungement parts may not affect everyone.

“As chief of police, all I ask is for people to be patient,” he said. “Since some individuals will read the statutes and bylaws and conclude that it is lawful and may be utilized anyplace, it is important to me that they get the proper information. Be careful out there, please.

“Just take precautions, show tolerance, and wait your turn. Also, make sure you read the tiny print so they know exactly what they can and cannot do with their medical and recreational marijuana.”

The City Council passed an ordinance legalizing sales and possession on February 6, bringing local regulations into compliance with Amendment 3’s state-level legislation. Some of the legislation explicitly forbade the use, possession, and sale of such items by and to minors; others forbade the driving of motor vehicles while under the influence; and yet others outlawed their use in public areas.

Wilde stated that the department’s knowledge of the amendment was aided by the city attorney’s breakdown and examination of the amendment, which helped the department as well as the council in its ordinance drafting process. He emphasized the need for a collaborative approach when informing the public about modifications to public safety, saying that such alterations are always strictly adhered to.

Wilde assured the public that his agency will keep informing the public of developments in the law. Although he anticipates receiving phone calls from community people who do not support the constitutional change, he stressed that the department must police and comply with the laws of its governing bodies, including the legalization of recreational marijuana.

People seeing us out here enforcing these rules without understanding what we’re doing worries me the most. All they know is that it’s legal, but what does that imply in practice? Those were the words of Wilde. “We don’t want any misunderstandings to spread, so please keep in mind that this isn’t an open forum.

“Just have some patience and understanding during this transition period, and do all you can to educate yourself on the rules and regulations around the use of marijuana for medical and recreational purposes. Getting people educated on this issue on a personal level will be crucial to our community’s future.”

Wilde urged locals to familiarise themselves with a new city and state laws and make sure they fully grasp the implications of these alterations. Local ordinances can be found at library.municode.com/mo/jefferson city/codes/code of ordinances, sections 17 and 18, while state rules are available at health.mo.gov/safety/cannabis.

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Mohit Sharma

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