Missouri Authorities Say They Are Now Almost Prepared To Mention A Chief Equity Officer For Marijuana!

Missouri Authorities Say They Are Now Almost Prepared To Mention A Chief Equity Officer For Marijuana!

Voters approved a constitutional amendment in November making marijuana use for recreational purposes legal in Missouri, but it also sparked a disagreement over racial and economic injustice among social justice groups. Some people think a new law would give minority marijuana business owners more authority, while others are concerned that it will solidify the existing, unfair business licensing structure.

Much depends on the person chosen by the Department of Health and Human Services, the state body in charge of managing the marijuana program, to be the chief equity officer. The job of chief equity officer, mandated by state law to ensure that the social and economic justice criteria of Missouri’s new marijuana law are followed, must be in place for the state’s marijuana program by February 6.

Missouri Authorities Say They Are Now Almost Prepared To Mention A Chief Equity Officer For Marijuana!

According to a DHSS spokeswoman, the department will shortly make the chief equity officer public. According to Lisa Cox, DHSS’s spokeswoman, the department advertised the position on MO Careers, the state’s job listing website, from November 29 to December 9. We have a 10-day internal and external posting period for our openings, Cox said.

“Our positions are frequently selected and posted on Indeed and LinkedIn as well. We’re working through our procedure, and we’ll make a statement soon. The chief equity officer is a senior position within Missouri’s Division of Cannabis Regulation, according to the job description. The job description claims that the officer “will exercise significant freedom while simultaneously working closely with other teams within the division” and will answer directly to the division director.

The chief equity officer will be in charge of the equity measure, a micro license program created to provide chances in the industry for companies in underserved neighborhoods, which advocates of the legalization campaign claim are the first of its type in the country. Leading communication about the program and performing reviews “to assure microbusinesses are qualifying applicants and in good standing for licensure” are two of the officer’s duties.

Missouri Authorities Say They Are Now Almost Prepared To Mention A Chief Equity Officer For Marijuana!

Additionally, that person will develop and advertise educational programming about the licensing procedure as well as the resources and assistance offered to those who apply for microbusiness licenses. The officer will create a yearly compliance report and “develop targeted technical support programming to communities affected by cannabis prohibition.”

One of those who lobbied for the formation of a chief equity officer job as part of the legalization campaign was Adolphus Pruitt, head of the NAACP branch in St. Louis City. Pruitt claimed he was unsure of the number of applicants despite the NAACP sending out notices about the post. Pruitt stated that one of the officer’s most significant duties is to contribute to an annual report that offers “aggregate data for each type of license.”

According to him, this might be the way to achieve the objectives of the Missouri marijuana sector for minority inclusion. Pruitt asserts that in order for the state to consider racial diversity in the license application process, the report should include demographic information about business owners and their employees.

Missouri Authorities Say They Are Now Almost Prepared To Mention A Chief Equity Officer For Marijuana!

However, the state of Missouri must carry out a “disparity study” in order to fend off legal objections to such a move, which are frequently brought by white-owned firms. According to Pruitt, the compiled data would accomplish the same goal as a disparity analysis. Pruitt told The Independent in November that “there ain’t much we can do without having data.” “They sue and we lose if the state enacts [minority participation] targets without data. We’ve traveled that path before.

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